Masking

Watercolor Online's Networking Forum: Enter the Watercolor Online Question and Answer section.Masking
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Saturday, September 27, 2003 - 12:16 pm:

I use WN masking fluis. However after removing the masking fluid the area looks unreal and does not fit the rest of the painting. The masked area has sharp edges and then it is hard to tie it with the rest of the painting. I am able to sometimes solve this by lightening the edges by scrubbing the edges with wet brush. If the background is a staining color then there is nothing I can do. Any ideas how some of you may have handled this? Is there another masking fluid that works better? Anyone used Pebeo Gum?.
Thanks in advance.
GS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ellie Blana on Saturday, September 27, 2003 - 07:34 pm:

This is not on masking and do not know how to put this in the proper catagory. We have a Newman Decor watercolor airbrush picture and it is signed by the artist, 'Guild'. It is marked as #1658 and has 'South' penciled on it also. It is of a pink bird and light blue flowers with a dark blue backrgound section on a white matte board. It has a tan painted, possibly pink base, plaster frame of simulated tassels. Does anyone know about this picture or artist? Is it from the 40's? Thanks.

Ellie Blana


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bob Smith on Sunday, September 28, 2003 - 08:06 pm:

....retired Architect (now artist) seeking W/C artist, preferably female, to share duties on sailboat for trip from Key West, via Bahamas, south coast of Cuba, Caymans, on to Yucatan, and beyond, sole purpose of trip to seek out and capture subject matter for W/C and sketches of subject matter on the way, this is a serious offer by USCG licensed captain with references................thanks

Bob Smith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Jennifer on Monday, September 29, 2003 - 03:31 pm:

I recently came in contact with a pianting by Nissan Gallant Bernstien. I was wondering if anyone had some information on this artist. I was wondering if anyone know how much his paintings are selling for. Thank you very much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Dan Thomas on Monday, October 20, 2003 - 09:43 pm:

trying to find out how to remove the caps off old
watercolor tubes ?
Can I still use the paint inside ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Susan Gagnon on Thursday, October 23, 2003 - 10:45 pm:

Anyone know of a watercolor artist named Honor Bacon? The signed watercolors I have are from about the 20's or 30's. They are originals that have been nicely framed.
thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By ELIZABETH on Thursday, October 30, 2003 - 03:44 pm:

I am searching for information about artist M.J.Thompson.I have 3 watercolors signed and numbered purchased in Connecticut in 1980's.They were done between 1978 thru 1981.I am searching for the artist information.Any help would be a blessing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Jane Freeman on Friday, October 31, 2003 - 06:55 pm:

Masking is a difficult thing because of the hard edges it gives. Some artists have played with adding water to the edges to fade it out but that is an iffy thing. I never use masking because of this problem. Softening the edges as you have been doing is about all you can do...I do understand that Pebo is wonderful...thinner and goes on easy I guess. So you might want to try that. You could experiment with wetting the area on some scrap paper and then applying some masking and then letting it dry completely...seeing if it really does fuzz out on the edges...I would think one could do something like that but there again...I suspect it is chancy and mixed results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Debra Krebs on Friday, November 7, 2003 - 05:00 pm:

I am looking for information that would help me in pricing my work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Robert M. Kopsick on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 06:38 pm:

HI, I am looking for help identifying a water color artist. The picture is of a barn/landscape possibly from the Hudson River Valley in NY State.
The picture is signed E.D. 1905. We took it to an appraiser and he told us it was a quality piece of art and if we did some research and could attribute it to some one from the Hudson River Art school it could be pretty valuable. Any way I am looking for some place to start looking. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Sandra Van Den Ham on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 10:25 pm:

I'm just learning to use watercolor and have purchased a book that talks about painting a soft edge. However,the instructions aren't clear to me as a new watercolorist. It says "Use Yellow Ochre, clear water and Cerulean Blue to paint a 'halo' around the image of a cat. Use a no. 8 round brush and paint YHellow Ochre on the outsdie edge, closets to the light source. Use the same brush and paint the middle with clear water. Gradually add Cerulean Blue to the water, making the edge away from the light source blue." Question...do I paint yellow Ochre, let it dry and then add water and then the blue...or... Do I paint the yellow and then while wet add more water and then introduce the blue while still wet? I don't want to have hard edges...but I don't want the colors to run together either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Sandra Van Den Ham on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 10:25 pm:

I'm just learning to use watercolor and have purchased a book that talks about painting a soft edge. However,the instructions aren't clear to me as a new watercolorist. It says "Use Yellow Ochre, clear water and Cerulean Blue to paint a 'halo' around the image of a cat. Use a no. 8 round brush and paint YHellow Ochre on the outsdie edge, closets to the light source. Use the same brush and paint the middle with clear water. Gradually add Cerulean Blue to the water, making the edge away from the light source blue." Question...do I paint yellow Ochre, let it dry and then add water and then the blue...or... Do I paint the yellow and then while wet add more water and then introduce the blue while still wet? I don't want to have hard edges...but I don't want the colors to run together either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By goblath on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 02:45 am:

What is "foxing" and how is it treated?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Adam Naubert on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 09:45 pm:

Hi, I'm new to watercolor but I have been drawing for quite awhile. I'm an animation student and I am interested in watercolour because I have seen wonderful things made with watercolour used in animation sequences or video games. I was wondering if someone could tell me if the following image is watercolour and if so is there a special technique involved to achieving this style? http://www.daena.net/mana/fans/wall/800-03.jpg

thank you
Adam


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By linda on Friday, November 28, 2003 - 01:51 pm:

I'm new to watercolor painting.......how do I get a smooth background wash,without "bleeding" into the images and color in the foreground ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Shannon Kelly on Sunday, November 30, 2003 - 06:28 pm:

I am looking to research a painting that was left to me by a family member. Is is a watercolor of what looks to be a New England Harbor. It is signed but I can not read the name, it starts Sessi and from that on is illegible. If anyone knows where I might research this further it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Please send any responses with watercolor as the subject matter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Dennis Williams on Tuesday, December 2, 2003 - 05:33 pm:

At 62, I'd like to get started in watercolor painting. Are pan paints or tube paints best for a beginner?. After a tube paint drys on the palette, can it be wetted and used later?
I used acrylic for my carved birds 20 years ago, but don't want to get into the mess of carving again, but want to get into something creative that I can do while motorhoming on weekends and at home.

Thanks, Dennis......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Cindi Myers on Sunday, December 7, 2003 - 01:43 pm:

I recently purchased a beautiful little watercolor, flowers in a basket, and it is signed J Torrey, 1976. Has anyone heard of J Torrey, I have tried looking up the name to no avail. I found it at a garage sale for $2.00, but, someone took the time to have it framed in an expensive frame. Thank You!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 - 02:22 pm:

What is used to coat or seal a finished water color ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Marti on Tuesday, December 9, 2003 - 05:53 pm:

Any information on e.smeaton?Miniature watercolors California landscapes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, December 15, 2003 - 09:15 am:

Is it possible to repair a water stained water color pencil drawing that has the stain line remainging from a spill ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Doug Bryant on Monday, December 29, 2003 - 01:37 pm:

I have two original signed watercolor prints, one is by joanie johnson framed and in mint condition and one is by esther friend framed and in mint condition. I would like to know about these artists and cant find any info, anyone ever heard of these artists?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ralph on Monday, January 5, 2004 - 12:59 am:

Anonymous, 12/15/03, I doubt that there is any way to eradicate the watermark stain.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ralph on Monday, January 5, 2004 - 01:06 am:

Anonymous, 12/9/03, Watercolors aren't coated with anything..usually. Some artists have taken to spraying on some commercially available acrylic anti-UV coatings. I haven't tried it. My understanding is that acrylic is inherently porous, so the coating won't waterproof the painting. It might serve to deepen the paint values and act to keep microbes and dust away from the paint. The usual protection method is to seal it behind glass, using mat board to keep the painting surface from touching the glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ralph on Monday, January 5, 2004 - 01:20 am:

Dennis,12/2/03, it is common practice to use tube colors, and to let them dry out somewhat in the palette. However, before using the dried out blobs of paint, you need to add water and let it soak in, so that the consistency returns to being a paste again. A drawback to this repeated drying and rewetting process is that the quality of the paint degrades. The paint starts to look rather chaulky. So, don't let the paint totally dry out, and don't wet it so much that the gum gets leached out of the paint. Also, its helpful to add some fresh tube paint each time you start to paint, using the left over paint as an extra source of pigment, but relying on the fresh paint for the areas of the painting that you think you need to control in a predictable fashion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ralph on Monday, January 5, 2004 - 01:35 am:

Linda, 11/28/03, Your question is the big issue for watercolorists! To create an even wash all around a previously painted irregularly shapen object, like a flower, is quite a challenge. It all depends on how large the area is that has to be evenly painted. For smaller passages, you can prewet the paper near the border of the already painted areas, and then do the background wash. After the wash dries completely, you go back in to dampen the edge of the wash and 'scrub' it in, in dry brush fashion, to blend it right up to the other area of the painting.
If you are dealing with a large area, you might have to resort to 'reserving' the area previously painted.
Or, you need to reverse the process and do the wash first (in easily lifted paint), then after the wash dries, re-wet it and remove the (easily removed) wash for the area you want to paint in opposition to the wash.
As a last resort, you can mask first, add the wash,remove the mask, then finish with the positive part of the painting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Wednesday, January 7, 2004 - 01:01 pm:

I am trying to find out inforamtion regarding an artist that signed the watercolor as ar.chabouran.
This is an ocean scene with hillside and tree.I think the spelling of the artists name is correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Crystal on Monday, January 12, 2004 - 05:43 pm:

Am new to watercolor and am fixing up an un-used room where I can paint. Does any one have suggestions on how to equip the room...what kind of table, shelves, storage for paper, lighting etc. works best? Do I need to keep my blank paper away from the floor hot-air heat vent if it's in a storage tray? Are storage trays with open shelves ok? Or do they need to be drawers? How do you decide what height table to buy? What color is best for walls? Would appreciate any suggestions. Thanks, Crystal


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Susan Sargent on Sunday, January 18, 2004 - 07:33 pm:

I've been using watercolors for about 15 years and still have a basic question....does anyone have a satisfactory answer on how to stretch your paper? I usually use Arches or WN 22 x 30 and feel like I have tried all...masking tape, gummed tape, staple guns. Still, I find no perfect method (lower my standards?) and get buckling or tape lifting. Very annoying. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks........Susan S.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Cyndy Allen on Tuesday, January 20, 2004 - 10:14 am:

I'm new to the list and hope to find some artists for business ideas & networking. I am currently unemployed, have health problems that limit my range of potential jobs, and am 54 yrs. old. I live in a rural area of Vermont, 1 hr. from Burlington. I have a degree in art education, but have not taught in the schools. I have painted in oils & watercolors part-time for the past 20 years and am now considering trying to work from home. As a Vocational Rehabilitation client, I am eligible for a business grant if I write an acceptable business plan. The problem is focusing on exactly what kind of art would be marketable. I have done a number of graphic art type projects, i.e. custom designs for baby announcements, wedding invitation suite, wedding program, etc. I also have some other ideas such as commissioned art work and small paintings of local scenes. (We live in a very pretty area where artists frequently paint.) Any ideas out there about starting & managing a home art business, products, marketing, networking, etc.? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ralph on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 12:15 pm:

Hi Cyndy, glad you found this site! Although I have been responding here for quite a while under the name of 'Ralph Hancock', giving technical advice whenever I can, there is another site that can probably help you better. There is a lot of 'how to' technical advice here, but I haven't seen much activity centered around your business interest topic. I would suggest that you check in at Wetcanvas.com, at their General Art Business Discussions forum. Wetcanvas is a very active online community of artists, and would be very helpful in your search for guidance. Best of luck, AndyRichardson.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By lynparks@hotmail.com on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 03:31 pm:

I would like to ask if anyone is familiar with a watercolorist - Ingrid Fromel Buckley. I have a watercolor that she did and can't find her anywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Lyn on Thursday, January 22, 2004 - 03:51 pm:

The name of the watercolor I have is "Garden Beckoning". It is by Ingrid Fromel Buckley. Any information????- please email me at lynparks@hotmail.com. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Sunday, January 25, 2004 - 11:54 pm:

Hello Crystal,

just checking if i am using this site correctly, sorry everyone!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 12:13 am:

In regards to answering your questions about setting up a studio, i have little advise as i still work amongst the kids & the works at my dining table which could work better i spose, so it sounds as though you are lucky! i do have advice on storing your paper, as i have found that some of my paper has become unusable after storing for periods of time, particularly if it is around things like flysprays, aerosoles, dust & cooking areas. I personally keep every sheet individually stored in a sealed plastic bag to keep the surface clean & residue free, but i am fussy about that... You gotta work clean with watercolours! I am sure that a good portfolio sleeve would be fine also. I am also careful to keep all my paper AWAY from mildew or damp areas (sometimes on walls), out of direct sun, especially if in plastic. Your table needs to be a comfortable height for you to work, cause if u are anything like me, i paint for hours at a time. of course lighting is very important, but be careful to buy lights with a daylight bulb, or a bulb that gives a light similar to daylight, as many do not. Apart from that, go with it & dont be too consumed by your environment, focus on your painting & comfort & youll be fine. happy painting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 12:27 am:

Dennis, i think that the 'chalkiness' that Ralph referrs to could be with paints which are student quality & perhaps not with artist quality? Could you be using some student quality paints Dennis? I find that the only drawback to reconstituting dry w'colour paint is that it is harder to suddenly pick up larger amounts of colour when its needed if it is still a bit dry. Also, sometimes a pallette can become dusty etc, so keep your pallette covered when not in use & check your pallette before you begin. I have always preffered tubes myself, but i know some brilliant artists who use blocks, so each to their own. But, use artist quality if you can possibly afford the difference!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 12:36 am:

Susan, depending on what kind of things you are painting, perhaps you could try a very heavy weight of paper, which tends to remain flatter. unless you are really wetting your work, a heavier paper, even 600gms+ may solve some of the old stretching problems light paper gives you. Maybe give it a try?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 12:40 am:

Linda, its a hard one eh? Keep on practicing, youll get it sometime! its the only way


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Mary Ann Miners on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 10:52 am:

Is there a way to use watercolours on canvas?
How do you have to treat the canvas to accept the watercolour?
Have become allergic to oils but miss the experience of painting on canvas.
Love the effects of watercolour and would like to use them on canvas.
Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 02:13 pm:

Has anyone ever heard of an artist namned Garman Morris? I have a Painting or Print from about the 1850s Titled A Gray Morning, a beautiful sea side painting and I would like to know more about the Artist, your help would be appreciated. Thank you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 04:35 pm:

Mary Ann, why dont you try acrylics, which you can water down if you want, use on canvas, paper, board etc? i havent painted on canvas with watercolour, but i dont see why you cant, so long as it is acid free etc. but you may have problems with too much texture & uneven dispersment of pigment. the best thing is to have a try... let me know eh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Mark Mortenesn on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 02:03 pm:

Susan, I use Arches 140 lb and stretch sizes up to 16 x
22 with no problems. I have several pieces of plywood
painted with latex paint to waterproof them. Soak
your paper in a bathtub just long enough to saturate,
then lay on the plywood and tape the edges with 2
inch paper tape. Use a sponge to wet the tape. Lay
flat until completely dry. I never have a problem with
buckling or warping no matter how much I wet the
paper when painting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By bwofford on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 11:53 pm:

To Crystal: I am new to painting watercolors as well. Here's how I have my room setup. I went to michaels and bought an adjustable height table. It came with a chair too and a nice adjustable lamp. You can even change the height of the front and back independently, so you can change the slope of it. The table retails for $169 to $199. Wait for a coupon. I paid less than $100 with the coupon. That might help you some. Thanks, Blake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By bwofford on Tuesday, January 27, 2004 - 11:59 pm:

To Mark: How much larger than the paper you are stretching is the board? What are the dimensions. Basically what I'm asking is do you wrap the tape around the edges of the board, so that it forms a "U" shape, or does your tape lay flat on the same surface as the paper? Curiosity kills the cat......

Thanks, Blake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Jo Russell on Thursday, February 19, 2004 - 04:21 pm:

I am new here and not a painter (no skill!). However, I have inherited a small watercolour, looks like an english landscape, with initals JH in lower left hand corner.

Has anybody heard of this person?

Jo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Tracey Clarke on Monday, February 23, 2004 - 10:01 pm:

hi, I am responding to a message posted on Jan. 26. I also have a Garman Morris painting, and I am trying to find more info. On a British info board, I saw a comment that his paintings are worth 300 to 400 pounds (which right now would be around $1000). But that's all I have found. If anyone else out there knows anything, please let us know. My painting is titled A Cloudy Night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By karolyn terpstra on Thursday, February 26, 2004 - 09:10 pm:

Has anyone heard of an artist by the name of Thomas Hol. ? I have what looks like a very old watercolor on canvas that is starting to crack. This name is in the lower right corner of the painting. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Linda Blum on Monday, March 1, 2004 - 05:50 pm:

Is there some special trick to remove the paper tape
from a finished watercolor and the board when you're
all done? I'm re-wetting the tape by sponging it with
water, then waiting a few minutes for it to soften before I
scrape it off with a spatula. This cannot be the way it's
supposed to be done, can it? I'm still left with a raggedy
brown tape edge on the perimeter of my painting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Frank Spink on Tuesday, March 2, 2004 - 12:49 pm:

I have been a watercolorist for many years. Have not been able to paint for a year from shoulder surgery. Many of my Winsor Newton watercolors tubes are now hard. Is there any way to resoften them in the tubes so they are useable?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By debbie flenley on Wednesday, March 3, 2004 - 06:59 am:

Hello - as for pricing your work....I use a committee of friends and people who know a little about art - i ask them what htey would pay for a picture. i use the lowest if i want it ot sell the highest if i likeit a lot and dont want to sell it. Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By july tigerlily on Wednesday, March 3, 2004 - 01:01 pm:

You can use old, dried, artist's grade watercolors in tubes.
Cut the tube, take out the paint, cut it into a piece to fit
your palette. Wet it just as you'd wet any paint you had let
dry in your palette. If it's student grade paint, please
consider getting artist's quality paint. If the cost is truly a
problem for you, look at Cheap Joe's house brand (I think
it's called "American Journey"). Personally, I prefer the
texture of other brands such as Daniel Smith, Sennelier,
Holbein, Winsor & Newton, but Cheap Joe's works just fine,
it is artist's quality, and I have used it. There is significantly
more pigment in artist's grade paints. In fact, it might take
you some practice to get used to painting with it, and it's
worth it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By july tigerlily on Wednesday, March 3, 2004 - 01:03 pm:

You can use old, dried, artist's grade watercolors in tubes.
Cut the tube, take out the paint, cut it into a piece to fit
your palette. Wet it just as you'd wet any paint you had let
dry in your palette. If it's student grade paint, please
consider getting artist's quality paint. If the cost is truly a
problem for you, look at Cheap Joe's house brand (I think
it's called "American Journey"). Personally, I prefer the
texture of other brands such as Daniel Smith, Sennelier,
Holbein, Winsor & Newton, but Cheap Joe's works just fine,
it is artist's quality, and I have used it. There is significantly
more pigment in artist's grade paints. In fact, it might take
you some practice to get used to painting with it, and it's
worth it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Jeff Smith on Wednesday, March 3, 2004 - 03:07 pm:

Grant Wood associate Florence Sprague was my grandmother. She taught for Grant Wood at his 1933 Stone City Art Colony in Iowa. I am selling a watercolor of hers on ebay. Look under "Florence Sprague".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Friday, March 5, 2004 - 04:30 am:

Linda, I think you are talking about stretching tape... but usually you stretch the paper with the tape outside the area you are working on. When you have finished you remove the tape & the taped area all together using a blade. Does that help?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Ethel Rybarczyk on Sunday, March 7, 2004 - 09:02 am:

Have a water color: Signature smudged. Appears to have the letters: G E Henres maybe another e.
Does this make sense to anyone? email:
erczyk@centurytel.net Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By walter quast on Thursday, March 11, 2004 - 03:05 pm:

Hello,
I am interested in some of the watercolors done by cecile johnson. Mostly the ones that have to do with skiing or ski areas or winter. Please E-mail any info to wquast@town.new-castle.ny.us
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Friday, March 12, 2004 - 04:58 pm:

Has anyone heard of an artist by the name of
J.R.Sanderson the picture i have is either watercolour or print depicting a thatched croft,
loch with a little island,rowing boat,mountains and heather.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 02:18 am:

I have a beautiful watercolor by the artist named Louis j. Kaep....I believe it was done in the 50's and its called shoreleave with the sixth fleet....its different scenes of american sailors at Europeon ports enjoying time off...if you have information about artist or his work please let me know....thanks....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Friday, March 19, 2004 - 03:11 pm:

i have a pair of garman morris watercolours called 'sunrise' and 'sunset'. anybody know anything about the artist or the paintings?


ta, irene


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By sfteddy on Sunday, March 21, 2004 - 02:20 pm:

I have been doing watercolors for about 2 years. During that time I have found it frustratring trying to shop for supplies at retail outlets where they treat watercolors as the "poor stepsister" to oils & acrylics. Shopping online can also be confusing and frustrating at some of the multi-faceted art supply sits. Therefore, I have decided to investigate starting a website business dedicated exclusively to watercolor supplies. Currently I am trying to do marketing research into the feasibility of such a site and have put together a survey. If anyone wishes to participate in that survey they can contact me at my e-mail address: sfteddy@bigfoot.com. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Linda Pickering on Monday, March 29, 2004 - 08:29 pm:

Chinese made Winsor & Newton Watercolor paint:Has anyone found out if these are artist quality, or student grade? They are always offered on e-bay, and I have bought 2 sets, but I don't find them as good as Artist W&N Watercolor paint. Would love to find out. Thanks, Linda Pickering


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Cindy Pagano on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 06:51 pm:

What is the best wy to stretch paper for watercoloring


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Lawrence de Rohan on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 12:30 pm:

In response to the anonymous message posted March 19th regarding the artist Louis J. Kaep, I can tell you that he was a relative of my deceased wife and lived and painted primarily in New England. The bulk of his work involved rural, small town and seashore scenes throughout that area. Mr. Kaep died about 12-15 years ago. Since my wife is also departed I have no additional information. I also have one his original watercolors "Village on the River", a fine pen & ink drawing of Saint Mark's Cathedral in Venice, and numerous prints of other works. I hope this helps.

Lawrence de Rohan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anthony Duffy on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 05:51 pm:

This in response to a posting placed on 21st August 2001, regarding a water colour by JF Canham. I have only recently visited this site and I am happy to tell the visitor patiooo.com that I have 2 watercolours by this artist dated 1929. Both are of desert scenes. I too am curious to know more about the artist. I have sent numerous e mails to the correspondent. Unfortunately I have had no reply. A response would be most welcome. I live on the Wirral in the UK.Perhaps you live locally also. Anthony Duffy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By ennis parker on Tuesday, April 20, 2004 - 03:39 pm:

In response to the post by Lawrence de Rohan, there is a print of a watercolor by Louis J. Kaep entitled, "At Peace With God," depicting services onboard the USS Forrest B. Royal in the 6th Fleet. I wonder, do you have a copy of this print? My father served aboard that ship during that timeframe, and I am trying to find a copy to present to him as a gift.

Ennis Parker


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By maryann on Tuesday, April 20, 2004 - 08:06 pm:

This is in respons eto the masking fluid question. You can eliminate the harsh edges by using white guache (sp?) around the masked edges with a course brush, such as a toothbrush. You will need to experiemnt with it but I have found it works very nicely. Hope this is helpful.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Friday, April 23, 2004 - 01:54 am:

I have a nice watercolor painting dated May, 1914 signed by Florence Maupin. Does anyone have any information regarding this artist?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Monday, April 26, 2004 - 07:35 am:

please any body tell me how i can check my network user whcih user most printing on printer.\


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Philip Clayton on Tuesday, April 27, 2004 - 03:24 pm:

I also have two watercolours by Garman Morris and would love to know anything about the artist. When were they likely to have been painted and any advise on value for similar paintings?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Cindy on Wednesday, April 28, 2004 - 03:23 pm:

Ok, so it has been awhile. Too long, in fact. I want to start watercoloring again and I bought a nice set of full pan watercolors. The problem is that I am not sure how to use them correctly. Any tips would be nice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Jon Chmelarik on Saturday, May 8, 2004 - 02:22 pm:

I have a beautiful watercolor that I purchased at an estate sale.Does anyone know about the artist 'Ruth M Smith'? It has 5 peacocks on it.Thanks ,Jonny


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By mary ann on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:56 am:

hi
I am having trouble with framing one of my original watercolor paintings. The top is buckled, even though I stretched the paper before I painted on it. I tried spraying the finished painting lightly with water (on the back) and then pressed it between some very heavy books. It helped a little but the buckles are stubborn. They are visible below the mat when the painting is framed. I have unframed it now and would like any suggestions for flattening it out. Thanks.
Mary Ann


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Friday, May 21, 2004 - 01:34 am:

Hi Mary Ann...........I suggest wetting the paper on the back alot..........then place it under a piece of glass, put heavy weights on top of the glass, leave overnight, by morning the buckles should be flat. I have done this and was amazed on how well it worked. Donna


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Wednesday, May 26, 2004 - 11:37 pm:

Can anyone give me any information on how to remove or repair a mold/mildew marking on a watercolor painting?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By jwc on Thursday, May 27, 2004 - 05:15 pm:

How do you determine the selling price of a watercolor painting? I need some advice since I am beginning to sell some of my work. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By julie on Sunday, May 30, 2004 - 09:26 am:

i want to get rid of black paint i used on my watercolor painting. i saw on the internet there is lifting medium from winsor& newton. But i don't have that lifting midium. Is there any other way to get rid of black and repaint on that spot??????? help!!!!!! urgent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By julie on Monday, June 7, 2004 - 08:30 pm:

I would love to learn painting cloud & ocean.
Anyone knows the techniqe or the site?
thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By laine on Tuesday, June 8, 2004 - 09:25 pm:

I'm looking for any info on the 20th century watercolor artist R. Hills Bemish. I have a large watercolor of his and am trying to research it.
Thanks !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Diane Irwin on Friday, June 11, 2004 - 04:00 pm:

Please help! I have a 36x20 pastel chalk on board landscape by J.W.Clarke which was in done in 1927. I need any information anyone might have on this artist and his work. I do understand from information supplied by The Toledo Musuem of Art that his work has been exhibited by The Watercolor Society but I am currently unable to find out anything more about him. Anybody know where I might go for information? Please email me. Thank you...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Kimberlyn Bacchus on Friday, June 11, 2004 - 09:36 pm:

I wish to enter an art competition which requires the painting of an entire piece within 3hrs. The topic calls for the painting of human characters and though I study art at school, my class never learned to draw or paint human characters. Can someone give me tips or recommend books that give tips on painting humans in watercolour?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By wayne hosaka on Wednesday, June 23, 2004 - 07:56 pm:

are you familiar with yarka brand professional watercolors? how do they rate against your favorites? what are your top five brands irregardles of cost?
thanks
wayne


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Troy on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 11:22 pm:

I am a beginner in watercolors and I have heard that you can leave paint(from the tubes) on your pallette and leave them there without them drying. Is this true??? Any advice on mixing the colors (especialy the actual proccess) oppose to the variations in color would also be appreciated. Thanks,
Troy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Diane on Monday, June 28, 2004 - 04:34 pm:

I have a set of (5),16x6 pictures by I. or C. Swinburne.They are landscapes of wooded areas with roads or ponds.They're MOSTLY black/white ,sepia tones.The bridge picture has brown/green vegetation,tan bridge and some black/white.One b/w has brown tree trunks,some green vegetation/brown mountains.The colors are flat,like a print. Two pictures have painted black roofs/fences that you can feel the paint.One corner says "The Ullman NY Co." HELP w/info about Co. and artist. THANKS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Troy on Monday, June 28, 2004 - 09:21 pm:

I am a beginner in watercolors and I have heard that you can leave paint(from the tubes) on your pallette and leave them there without them drying. Is this true??? Any advice on mixing the colors (especialy the actual proccess) oppose to the variations in color would also be appreciated. Thanks,
Troy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Lou on Wednesday, June 30, 2004 - 12:24 am:

I have an old oil painting by J.Koens or Koenz or Koeng.(unsure of spelling of last name) It's an early American (Colonial) painting of a woman holding a baby. She is sitting between a bassinet and a table. I would like information on the artist.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Diane on Wednesday, June 30, 2004 - 12:53 am:

Is anyone familiar with a painter,possibly French, named Revillon? The painting is of a Venetian scene. There's a canal down the middle,vegetation on the left and back ,and architecture on the right.The colors are mainly sage, beige and rust. The sky/background are light blue/white.Louis Henri Revillon and Marie Revillon are entries in E. Benezit as painters. I'm unable to find more info on them.Some genealogy listings show several Maries.Louis'depuis was 1883,Marie's depuis was 1887 .I would like ANY INFO ON REVILLON!! THANKS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Kim Steacy on Friday, July 2, 2004 - 06:02 pm:

I used Grumbacher misket on a painting and left it for a year. I am now finishing the painting and can't get the misket off with an eraser.

Any suggestions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Jane Freeman on Friday, July 2, 2004 - 11:02 pm:

Misket left that long will not likely come off...it is best to remove it as soon as you are done.
In answer to putting the tubes of paint on your palette...they will dry but with just a little water you will have nice workable paint again. Many of the questions you will find answers to at www.artcafe.net at the Cafe boards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Carolyn Lubowicki on Saturday, July 3, 2004 - 04:54 pm:

I recently purchased 2 large watercolors from a resale shop which are signed by the artist. They are matted and framed behind glass, but I cannot make out the artists last name. It looks like Carol "Grigen". My question is does anyone know how I would go about gathering info about, and identifying an artist? I just don't know where to begin. The backs of the frames are marked- Southfield, MI. The artwork is also numbered on the back. You can e-mail me at - Reader521@aol.com. I appreciate any help in this! Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Rebecca on Saturday, July 10, 2004 - 02:25 pm:

I am looking for information about a watercolor artist who signed his painting Geo. Beot. I purchased the painting in Missouri, any info would be appreciated. Thanks,
Rebecca


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Nicholas Simmons on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 - 05:43 pm:

Hello - some painters here might be interested in viewing a online demo just finished at Wet Canvas. It has attracted quite a bit of attention. The thread is entitled "Faded Glory" and is featured in the watercolor gallery. Link:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=198295

Thanks for looking.
www.nicholassimmons.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By sherry on Friday, July 16, 2004 - 09:20 am:

Hi! i am trying to paint a tropical seaside landscape using watercolours and am finding it difficult to capture the glistening effect of the water. It's a tropical beach with turquoise/blue waters but my paintings of it always make the water appear dull colours. Ive heard that using salt in the sea is a good way to capture the glistening effect, but im not sure how? any tips and techniques would be greatly appreaciated!? thanks so much, sxx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Cheryl White on Saturday, July 17, 2004 - 01:06 am:

Hello Sherry.

What you need is blank spots in the panting. The fastest way is to drybrust the paint on. It must be in horizontal strokes, or it will not look like water. It takes a lot of experience and control to pull this off. A less straightforward, but foolproof trick is to use a masking fluid pen, and make short horizontal strokes with the thin side if the nib. The only one I have found that can do this is from www.larrysart.com. You have to look in the artists supply section. The only thing you must do is to keep all strokes horizontal, the shorter the better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bob R. Brasher on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 06:25 am:

Hello, Years ago I acquired a painting done by Louis Kaep titled "Shore Leave". In the lower right hand corner it has LOUIS J. KAEP ANA Shore Leave #11 With the Sixth Fleet 12. Am selling if anybody interested. Framed by the Picture frame company of Wash D.C. Can email pics.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bill in Murrieta on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:18 pm:

I am responding to this question:
By Cindy on Wednesday, April 28, 2004 - 03:23 pm:
Ok, so it has been awhile. Too long, in fact. I want to start watercoloring again and I bought a nice set of full pan watercolors. The problem is that I am not sure how to use them correctly. Any tips would be nice.

A very simple question that calls for a very complex and lengthy answer. I'll try to be brief:
1. Buy a good watercolor sketchbook. I like the Canson Montval All-Media Book. You can paint on both sides of the pages, and it takes watercolor beautifully. Start sketching and painting anything and everything. Your goal is not prize-winning paintings (at this stage) but practice and experience. Fill up one sketchbook, and then buy another and keep going. Practice drawing every day.
2. Emphasize getting the drawing right, when you sketch, Use pencil first, then if you like redraw, going over the pencil with ink--waterproof. Once you are done with the drawing, float in some colors. Try to do this simply. Play with it. Experiment. Leaving some of the paper unpainted is usually a good idea. Again, it's not the success of the drawing/painted sketch that's important here. But your ongoing experience with your paints and the process of drawing and painting--that's important.
3. Go to an art store, or Borders or Amazon.com. Browse through watercolor painting instruction books. When you find one that has paintings you like, get it and do the exercises.
4. Finally, here are some principles that can help you:
Do this as much as you can practically do it: Paint it and leave it alone—watercolor washes, large and small, do better by them selves, unmolested.
Build values slowly. Don’t make large leaps (like from light to dark suddenly). Proceed thoughtfully. Once again, pause between stages and analyze what you’ve done and consider how to proceed next.
Superkey to progress, to learning quickly As you are painting, “give yourself a painting lesson”: Always as you plan and as you paint, watch what you are doing and take note of what works and what doesn’t, perhaps even write your observations down to help you remember them. Learn from your own efforts. This is a surefire way to make progress (and a very efficient use of the time spend with a brush in your hand).
Have a center of interest and related everything to it in every way you can think of. (If you divide your sheet of paper, the area you plan to paint, into thirds, using two vertical and two horizontal lines. Each the 4 places where these lines cross is an excellent place for a center of interest.) All main lines should lead to it.
Use a limited palette--choose a few pigments and stick to them—this provides a better chance of color harmony and clean, beautiful color.
Mix large puddles of color—mix a lot more than you think you’ll need—usually this means lots of water, lots of color. This is extremely simple advice but extremely helpful. This encourages juicy, flowing, successful—and that means beautiful—washes, and it also prevents running out of a mixture prematurely, which can be disastrous.
Interlocking lights and darks—in the designing stage. Think of the white paper and the light areas of your composition as similar to passages in a maze where you can walk unobstructed. The hedges in the maze are the darks connected with mid-tones. Connect the lights to each other, creating passageways; creating a large, interestingly-shaped light-value area. Then, connect the darks to each other or via mid-tones.
Paint when your paper is dry or when it’s wet, usually not in between, especially when it is close to drying. Painting a damp area is very tricky and often proves disastrous. You can, however, scrape a damp area for textural effects (for example, for grass or weeds).
Don’t give up halfway through (usually when you have done the lights and mid-tones and before adding the darks). Paintings often look their worst at this stage, and you’ll be tempted to despair.
Paint at an angle. Prop up your board at least 5 degrees. Some paint at 35 to 80 or 90 degrees (note: this is not recommended for wet-in-wet painting because the super wet paint runs off the paper!). Painting at an angle help you keep your color clean by allowing the sediment to drift downward in your washes, keeping it clearer.
With a freshly painted area, soften some edges or leave them hard—your basic two choices. (Consider the effect before you chose. Or, refer to your value plan.)
GOOD BOOKS: These principles were gleaned from many books and my own experiences with the medium. My advice is to read widely and paint a lot and watch what works and what doesn’t, better write it down—and you’ll learn quickly. When you find a book you feel is worth in depth study, spend some time with it and paint the paintings you like in it (not as your own paintings but as exercises to try to duplicate successfully the techniques and effects. For starters, you might try these two by Tony Couch: Watercolor You Can Do It and Tony Couch’s Keys to Successful Painting (these are also mentioned below under “Design”). For a unique and somewhat Chinese approach to painting, try: Painting Flowers in Watercolor With Charles Reid (his advice on modified contour drawing, brush handling, and shadows is right on). A real treasure trove is Tom Lynch’s 100 Watercolor Workshop Lesson Charts, especially when studied—and you need to study them; there’s lots of information, but it is concise—in conjunction with his book with similar content, but explained more thoroughly: Tom Lynch’s Watercolor Secrets. And for a great sketching approach to learning: The Joy of Watercolor and More Joy of Watercolor by David Lyle Millard (try Amazon.com).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bill in Murrieta on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:29 pm:

Answer for this person: By wayne hosaka on Wednesday, June 23, 2004 - 07:56 pm: are you familiar with yarka brand professional watercolors? how do they rate against your favorites? what are your top five brands irregardles of cost?
thanks
wayne
are you familiar with yarka brand professional watercolors? how do they rate against your favorites? what are your top five brands irregardles of cost?
thanks
wayne
On Yarka, try this website:
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/pigmt2.html#yarka
My favorites, in the order of preference, are MGraham, Daniel Smith, Blockx, Maimeri and Winsor Newton.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bill in Murrieta on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:33 pm:

Response to this Person: By Mary Ann Miners on Monday, January 26, 2004 - 10:52 am:
Is there a way to use watercolours on canvas?

I suppose by now someone has told you about the new watercolor canvas. I may be just what you are looking for:

Go here: {http://www.fredrixartistcanvas.com/frameproducts.html,http://www.fredrixartistcanvas.com/frameproducts.html}


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bill in Murrieta on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 11:55 pm:

For
By julie on Monday, June 7, 2004 - 08:30 pm:
I would love to learn painting cloud & ocean.
Anyone knows the techniqe or the site?
thank you.

Simple questions; the answer can take books!
Here is some info in brief:
Skies: I recommend you start by learning to paint clouds wet-in-wet--actually by that I mean paint around the clouds. Do this:
1. Draw your clouds on your paper lightly in pencil.
2. Wet the paper thoroughly, the whole sheet (it should be taped down with masking tape on all four sides before you wet it, by the way).
3. Mix some blue paint (for this example). If you have it, ultramarine blue mixed with Thale blue.
4. Now check your paper. If it has dried so that you cannot see the "shine" of the water on it, it has probably dried enough for the next step.
5. Pick up paint with your brush. Touch its knife edge (near the metal ferrule on the brush) to a damp sponge, to soak out some of the water but only a little of the paint.
6. Now paint around your clouds, outlining them, that is, follow the lines. And then quickly finish the sky--that is paint the rest of the sky blue.
7. Next--this is important--don't touch it any more! Even if you see something you'd like to fix. Let it dry.
That's one way to paint clouds. There are many.

On ocean/sea/surf/rocks, etc., I suggest you take a look at this book by E. John Robinson: "Paint the Sea and Shoreline in Watercolors Using Special Effects." There are also two videos that accompany this book (for an additional price) entitled "Seascapes in Watercolor" part 1 and part 2. This book and the videos are very good.
Go here on the web: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/103-9871385-2184636
Best wishes, Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Leah Sharpe on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 01:14 am:

I have inherited a watercolor painting signed Koenen. It is a waterside picture. The back of the frame says Lambert frame and picture company, inc. Brooklyn,N.Y. St. Louis, Mo.
Do you know anything about this artist?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Mary Ellen on Monday, August 2, 2004 - 11:26 am:

I have a 1906 painting by A. L. Croft. It's a
seascape and is signed and dated twice. Is
anyone familiar with this artist and his/her
work?

Thanks,
Mary Ellen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Bernie Mullins on Tuesday, August 3, 2004 - 05:55 pm:

Hi
My name is Bernie
I am looking to get a copy of a work done by Sister Anne Therese Dillen. It is from a collection she did entitled Dark Rosaleen. They are all paintings related to the Irish Famine.
If anyone knows how to contact her or how to avail of a copy, I would very much appreciate it.

Regards
Bernie Mulllins


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Sunday, August 8, 2004 - 02:41 pm:

Need information how to properly seal new Fredrix watercolor canvas.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Lorrie K on Sunday, August 8, 2004 - 10:20 pm:

I have a couple flower watercolors by Edythe Bell. She lived for many years in Saginaw, MI, and later in Minneapolis. She died in 1997, but that is all I know. Could anyone direct me to a resource telling more about her, or is her work listed in a directory somewhere? Thank You! Please email me {tomandlor@earthlink.net


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 10:13 pm:

g'day i am an aussie!!! and enjoy nice walks on the beach! i like to paint the beach with my water COLOURS!! could anybody tell me the styles and techniques of using water colours? does anybody know about oil paints by any chance???? plz help me out! i am in need! thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Saturday, August 14, 2004 - 12:53 am:

Does anyone know of a site where Ican get tasteful photos of nude models to paint from


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Marilyn West on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 12:19 pm:

Would anyone know of any watercolor artists in the Columbus, MS area who gives lessons. I have recently moved to the area (live just over the border in AL) from New England, where I took group lessons for a year. I would love to resume my learning experience, but even after checking with the local arts center have not been successful in finding a teacher. Any information would be greatly appreciated...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Sunday, August 22, 2004 - 01:27 pm:

I used to have a paper backed book that was full of photos of the human body in various poses specifically for life drawing. I have seen it recently at bookstores. Don't know the name and it was in b/w.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By bpolm on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 10:39 pm:

anon on 8/22/04
I don't know if these will hit exactly on what you're looking for, but you might try:
The Human Figure, A Photographic Reference for Artists by Erki A. Ruby; publisher Van nostrand Reinhold, NY. (This may be it)
A classic is The Human Figure in Motion by Eadweard Muybridge, Dover Publications--huge amounts of reference photos, tho a bit small in size.
Bill, Murrieta, CA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By bpolm on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 10:46 pm:

For Marilyn West on Friday, August 20, 2004 - 12:19 pm
I don't know Colombus or anyone there. I live in Southern California.
But I suggest trying the 4 videos by Jack Reid--very good for beninners and intermediate watercolorists.
Visit him at http://www.jackreid.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Thursday, August 26, 2004 - 10:46 am:

I searched for responses to "anonymous" asking about removal of mildew stains from a watercolor and found none. Anyone else have any ideas for do it yourself techniques or a book on the subject? Restoration estimates from a professional conservator are probably more than my watercolor is worth although I do not know its value. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Naela Nawaz on Sunday, August 29, 2004 - 05:14 am:

I tutor children for arts, specially water colors and oil painting. I gave children some landscape and floral subjects to make water colors on regular oilpaint canvas, using vibrant colors(mostly opaque) the results were always amazingly beautiful. I did not know that water color was done on canvas untill I visited this site, I used to believe it as my own original idea :)
I want to know the name or kind of canvas that is used for water colour specially, does that has got some special treatment?


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